Tag Archives: cocktail party

Want to Live a Long, Healthy Life? Phone A Friend.

I recently read an article titled, Why Millennials Are Lonely. In it, author Caroline Beaton cites a number of potential reasons for our increasing sense of isolation and one cause, no surprise, is that social media has taken the place of what Beaton refers to as “offline” socialization. In other words, many people are spending time communicating through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and texts, rather than sharing face time with friends. In the short-term, electronic communications can make us feel more connected to our peers; however, because the interactions are fleeting and lack depth, with time they can leave us empty.

That is especially sad, because loneliness is shown to increase our risk of heart disease and early death.

Conversely, a longitudinal study on health and happiness, conducted by researches at Harvard University, found that good health and longevity are strongly linked to building and maintaining positive relationships. People who have a close-knit group of friends and family members, will live longer and healthier lives. If you’d like to learn more about this 80 year project, check out Director Robert Waldingers Ted Talk here.

As the mother of a child who will grow up in a world even more consumed with electronics and Artificial Intelligence, I want to ensure that I am teaching her to value and sustain social connections. At seven years old, she already shows a deep interest in texting and Facebook. She loves the real-time conversations she can have with relatives across the world, even if they are limited to a few lines of text and some well placed emojis. And who doesn’t? Let’s face it, social media is convenient and instantaneous. However, she also loves hosting sleepovers and special events for her close friends. She finds joy in doing kind things for people, like handwriting thank you notes and gifting favorite books to younger children. Those are the interests I want to nurture.

How can we role model friendship for the young people in our lives, and in the process alleviate loneliness we may feel? Here are some quick and easy ways to connect with loved ones and build a deeper sense of community.

1.) Take time away from social media

When we step away from our phones, ipads, and computers, we become aware of something really interesting. Life is happening all around us! And when we take time to connect, life flows through us. If we just look up for a few moments, we might find something beautiful staring us in the face.

2.) Invite a friend on a walk.

Every evening after my little one has been tucked in for the night and my husband is relaxing with a good book, I take a walk through my neighborhood. Seeing other people out and about, walking their dogs, or chatting with friends on the front porch makes me feel connected to the place where I live. I will often invite one of my closest pals to go along with me. This is an easy way for us to get exercise and fresh air, but more importantly, it is a way to connect without any distractions. We talk about work, family, plans for the future. Nothing is off-limits. Those walks are therapeutic and they are something I look forward to them during my work day. Here’s another post we wrote about this topic.

3.) Host a “game night”

I grew up in the 90s when board games were still a big deal. From Trivial Persuit, to Pictionary, to Scattergories, you could usually find my family “gaming” around the dinner table on Friday nights. There is something lighthearted and comforting about the shenanigans that ensue as you play one of these classic games. Invite a small group of people over to share a bottle of wine and hunker down on the living room floor for some friendly competition. It is a great way to bond.

4.) Perform a selfless act for someone in need

Whether you bake cookies for the young family down the street, cuddle kittens at the local Human Society, or volunteer at Bingo night for the nursing home in your community, give selflessly to help others. As we take the focus off of ourselves and think of our neighbors, we can eliminate some feelings of isolation. Better yet, build community service, volunteerism, and regular acts of kindness into your life and model it for the children you know.

5.) Throw a cocktail party

Of all the parties you can put together, this one is the easiest. All you need are two cocktail choices that you mix ahead of time, and maybe a bottle of red and white wine. Put out a couple of simple snacks and ask everyone to bring a favorite wine or beer to share. Create a fun play list, and then mingle for a few hours. Cocktail parties are a great way to bring new people together. You can invite work colleagues, college friends, and some acquaintances that you’ve wanted to get to know better. It is a great way to build your social network.

6.) Pick up the phone

There is something melodic about the voice of a loved one. When I’m feeling lonely, there is always one person who can make me feel better. It’s been that way since I was a kid. After a hard day, if I can hear my brother’s voice, all is well with the world. We text an awful lot, but there are days when listening to his jokes and hearing is laughter is the only thing that will do. Next time you reach for your phone to text a friend, give them a ring instead.

Finally, this post was written to people who may have let personal connections slip away, or who may be looking for ways to prioritize their friendships. If you are feeling more than lonely…if you are depressed or despondent, it isn’t because you haven’t tried hard enough and we encourage you to seek help. Depression can’t be fixed with a cocktail party or a nature hike. And finally, because it can’t be posted enough, here is the number of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255 (1-800-273-TALK)

Style Icon Peggy Guggenheim

Peggy Guggenheim

Trailblazer. Tastemaker. Trendsetter. Entertaining inspiration. Peggy Guggenheim.

I’ll never forget the day I was introduced to Peggy.

It was an October morning in Venice in 1999. The weather was lousy. It was cold and damp – the kind of day that chills your bones. People were out and about, wrapped in fashionable trench coats with the collars turned up to defend against the harsh wind. I stood along the Grand Canal in my college-chic GAP hoodie, entranced by gondolas slowly bobbing along steely water and jagged waves lapping against sinking plaster buildings. Everything was eerily gray like a pastel drawing that had been washed away with the wipe of a sponge.

I was studying abroad and for weeks had been traveling throughout Europe visiting the most important works of art from antiquity through the Baroque. This journey had taken me to the Louvre, the Borghese, the Prado, the Venice Academy, and more. Quite honestly, all of the masterpieces were beginning to bleed together and I was tired. In fact, I wondered if I wasn’t having some sort of allergic reaction to old art, as I seemed to lose my energy every time I entered another museum. On this particular day, I was visiting one I had never heard of before. The Peggy Guggenheim.

As a student of art history I was well acquainted with the Guggenheim name – but Peggy? Little did I know, I was being introduced to one of the most influential figures in 20th century art.

With a yawn, I stepped off of the Grand Canal and into her museum. Once inside my eyes grew wide as I took in the scene. It was as if I had entered another world. The Italian palazzo, which was had been her home from 1949-79, felt alive – it was breathing with bursts of vibrant color, undulating lines, splatter marks, and wild textures. The rooms did not feel “over stuffed” as some European galleries do. Instead, each piece of art was given room to shine. I felt true joy as I engaged with works by Picasso, Dali, Kandinsky, and Klee.

An eccentric heiress from the United States born in 1898, Peggy Guggenheim’s interest in avant-garde art developed while she was living in Paris in the 1920s. It was there that she was introduced to writers and artists who were challenging social norms of the time. Peggy, who as a teenager shaved off her eyebrows to shock those around her, found kindred spirits in Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, and Samuel Beckett. It was because of these relationships that she began acquiring works of the Dadaists, Cubists, and Surrealists and abstract expressionists. Not an artist herself, this was Peggy’s way of becoming a central figure in this world of original, innovative ideas.

Peggy ran galleries in Europe and America. During World War II, she shipped a huge number of paintings out of Paris to New York City, protecting them from the Nazi war on Modernism. She gave Jackson Pollock his first exhibit, as well as several other artists whose work would influence modern culture. She had a terrific eye for spotting talent, anticipating the next “big thing”, and was happy to give her muses an international stage. She is known to have had numerous lovers including the most influential names in the art world.

After visiting her museum, I became a huge fan of Peggy Guggenheim. I quickly devoured her biography Art Lover by Anton Gill. In 2015, a documentary film on her life was released: Peggy Guggenheim Art Addict, which I would highly recommend as it features intimate interviews with Peggy.

Today a photograph of one of her cocktail parties hangs in my living room, reminding me to savor the simple pleasures in life.

Peggy loved being surrounded by creative people with creative ideas, and she was well know for hosting parties for her friends. It is said she usually served horrible food and bad wine, but people always attended her gatherings because they celebrated life. And that is what people loved about Peggy.

So often these days, if you pick up a book on entertaining you’d think you have to be a Michelin star chef in order to host an event. What if we just served mediocre food and cheap wine, and instead focused on building deeper friendships? Wouldn’t it be amazing to skip the fancy name cards, cloth napkins, and menus scrolled on chalkboards? Would the world fall apart? That is why Peggy is one of my entertaining heroes. Let’s celebrate idiosyncrasies. Instead of being shallow, let’s go deep where the most interesting connections happen.

In 2017 I resolved to host more gatherings. It is time display my favorite pieces of art, serve imperfection on a platter, and spend quality time with great friends.

Party at Peggy's House

Fabulous Peggy

Peggy Guggenheim in Venice

A (Beyond) Easy Cocktail Party Inspired by Madrid, Spain

Hey friends! So we’ve made it through the holidays (whew!) and now, for those of us who live in cold weather climates, we’re entering the doldrums of winter….which may or may not last until mid-May. To keep our spirits bright during these grey, wintry days, our January posts will be devoted to comforting, nourishing foods that keep us well fed, as well as simple activities that help us connect with family and friends.

For this post, I’m putting together a cocktail party that is SO EASY to execute you have to try it. The inspiration comes from my travels in Madrid, Spain.

Madrid is a beautiful city with great art and culture, beautiful architecture, and delicious food. The nightlife is both inviting and exciting! Once while in the city, my girl friend and I were eating at a restaurant near Plaza Mayor when we were whisked away by a group of local gals who took us on a dancing adventure until the wee hours of the morning. They remained our friends throughout our visit, meeting us out for drinks and introducing us to more people each time. This type of hospitality is not unusual in Madrid. There is a sense that everyone is welcome, and certainly the more the merrier.

In neighborhoods throughout Madrid, once the sun sets the streets come alive with late night wanderers for whom the bars serve up drinks and tapas until sunrise. My favorite pubs in Madrid are the Siderias or cider bars. There, you can experience one of the best culinary pairings I’ve ever tasted in my life – cider and blue cheese! These flavor companions are the foundation of this cocktail party.

The Party

Theme: Spanish tapas

Featured Flavors: Hard cider and blue cheese

Number of Guests: The more the merrier

Advanced Notice: None. This party is so easy that you could whip it together in minutes!

Invitation Type: Simple text or phone call

The food for this party requires no prep – simply unpackage and serve! It also doesn’t require a large space – we just spread our food across a coffee table and invited guests sit on floor cushions as we shared appetizers in a casual and cozy setting. Our menu consisted of:

Tapas: blue cheese montaditos (small, open-face sandwiches), mixed olives, dried fruits, nuts, cocktail shrimp, and pickled veggies. For the vegans, I substituted Treeline aged cashew cheese (which is earthy and delicious).

Drinks: Hard cider and Spanish red wine

Blue cheese tapas

 

 

Cider

 

Table of food

What could be easier than this? The holidays are over, but we don’t have to put entertaining on hold. And we certainly don’t have to make entertaining difficult. So pick up a baguette, some blue cheese, and a bottle of cider on your next trip to the store…and then invite some pals to share.